Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss II: A Review

Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss II
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss II

“If you really want to write, the best way to go about it is just start writing.”

And thus, although I’m on call yet again tonight and the pager is blowing up, I’m just going to get started writing a review for this latest book I picked up from Venger Satanis, High Priest of Kort’thalis Publishing. This is Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss II, which is the second part follow up to the original.

Just like the other products in what I call his “Like a Fucking Boss” product line, AWLAFB2 is easy to read, gets you straight to the point without wasting your time, and is chock full of gorgeous artwork that just inspires you to grab your notebook, graph paper and pen and start brainstorming ideas to torture your friends at your next session.

Currently at a mere $4 on RPGnow, this book is 18 pages with an awe inspiring cover, 5 kick ass whole page artworks and 1 sexy half page art piece. All the PDFs in this line are offered in both the full color version and a tree hugging printer friendly version. The layout is excellent, so the large art pieces and the text work very well despite a heavy water colored (or are these blood stains…?) whole page background art. Overall, the layout, color choices, and art are similar to part 1 (which was already very professional appearing), but it’s looking even tighter. Apparently Venger is becoming even more of an expert in his desktop publishing skills.

The text is laid out in 28 small sections with far ranging bits of advice. Each section is typically 3 to 5 paragraphs with a heading that is usually self descriptive like “Interior Art” or “Introducing NPCs” but sometimes something more catchy that forces you to read further like “Let Them Eat Cake”, “Hat Rack Descriptions”, and “Needs More Tentacles”.

The writing style (and art choice) is typical Venger Satanis. Occasional edgy and humorous topics and language along with awesome old school art, some of which is NSFW but all of it is awesome. Included are bits of wisdom spread throughout in easy to comprehend examples that get right to the heart of the matter. Kinda like one of the common themes in the entire book. Your responsibility (as a writer of adventures) is to get to the point so that the reader can get most of what they need without getting bogged down, while at the same time injecting the seeds necessary to allow the reader to expand in the direction they need in real time at the gaming table.

So. if this sounds at all interesting, then just pick it up and read it. You’ll learn something, or at least be inspired. I promise. And then, go write mega dungeons worth of rooms with greater than 3 paragraphs each. Seriously, I dare you. No, really, totally do that cause the High Priest demands it… [you’ll have to read page 10 to see why I say this, seriously the funniest thing ever!]

 

Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss II on RPGnow or DriveThruRPG

 

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Swords & Wizardry Complete Rulebook for Pay What You Want

This may be a limited thing, but I see the Swords & Wizardry Complete Rulebook up on RPGnow/DTRPG for “Pay What You Want”. This is normally $34.99.

Written by Matt Finch and Published by Frog God Games, I’ve really been meaning to read through this. I may be a bit wrong, but from my research, regarding retro-clones, S&W is to be based on the 1974 OD&D. And, this seems to have a lot of support.

S&W comes in three versions, an essential “White Box” version, an updated “Core” version with expanded rules, and this “Complete” rulebook which I gather combines all the above.

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10 Years ago on Grognardia

I think it is interesting to read the first 4 posts on Grognardia. Quite prescient 10 years ago.

Starting with “What’s A Grognard?” is important to set a certain stage, that is the wisdom brought to the table by the experienced within a culture.

Then on to “Pulp Fantasy D&D” and “What is Pulp Fantasy?” details the increased desire to incorporate Appendix N influences when playing tabletop RPGs. However, these were posted in early 2008, (a month after Gary Gygax passed away BTW) and this is still a hot topic.

Lastly, in “D&D in the NewsJM totally calls the fate of 4e and sets the stage for (why I believe) 5e becomes a success despite all the other potential escapist distractions. That is, by returning to some of the core roots of D&D in earlier iterations. The one irony in this may be the same technology which brought an alternative fantasy escapism (and signaled a downfall of tabletop RPGs), the PC and the internet, have served 5e quite well in the form of virtual tabletops, Twitch, and YouTube which perform quite well with lighter versions of D&D.

Appendix N: Inspirational and Educational Reading

APPENDIX N:

INSPIRATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL READING

Inspiration for all of the fantasy work I have done stems directly from the love my father showed when I was a lad, for he spent many hours telling me stories he made up as he went along, tales of cloaked old men who could grant wishes, of magic rings and enchanted swords, or wicked sorcerers and dauntless swordsmen. Then too, countless hundreds of comic books went down, and the long-gone EC ones certainly had their effect. Science fiction, fantasy, and horror movies were a big influence. In fact, all of us tend to get ample helpings of fantasy when we are very young, from fairy tales such as those written by the Brothers Grimm and Andrew Lang. This often leads to reading books of mythology, paging through bestiaries, and consultation of compilations of the myths of various lands and peoples. Upon such a base I built my interest in fantasy, being an avid reader of all science fiction and fantasy literature since 1950. The following authors were of particular inspiration to me. In some cases I cite specific works, in others, I simply recommend all their fantasy writing to you. From such sources, as well as just about any other imaginative writing or screenplay you will be able to pluck kernels from which grow the fruits of exciting campaigns. Good reading!

Inspirational Reading:

Anderson, Poul. THREE HEARTS AND THREE LIONS; THE HIGH CRUSADE; THE BROKEN SWORD

Bellairs, John. THE FACE IN THE FROST

Brackett, Leigh.

Brown, Fredric.

Burroughs, Edgar Rice. “Pellucidar” Series; Mars Series; Venus Series

Carter, Lin. “World’s End” Series

de Camp, L. Sprague. LEST DARKNESS FALL; FALLIBLE FIEND; et al.

de Camp & Pratt. “Harold Shea” Series; CARNELIAN CUBE

Derleth, August.

Dunsany, Lord.

Farmer, P. J. “The World of the Tiers” Series; et al.

Fox, Gardner. “Kothar” Series; “Kyrik” Series; et al.

Howard, R. E. “Conan” Series

Lanier, Sterling. HIERO’S JOURNEY

Leiber, Fritz. “Fafhrd & Gray Mouser” Series; et al.

Lovecraft, H. P.

Merritt, A. CREEP, SHADOW, CREEP; MOON POOL; DWELLERS IN THE MIRAGE; et al.

Moorcock, Michael. STORMBRINGER; STEALER OF SOULS; “Hawkmoon” Series (esp. the first three books)

Norton, Andre.

Offutt, Andrew J., editor SWORDS AGAINST DARKNESS III.

Pratt, Fletcher, BLUE STAR; et al.

Saberhagen, Fred. CHANGELING EARTH; et al.

St. Clair, Margaret. THE SHADOW PEOPLE; SIGN OF THE LABRYS

Tolkien, J. R. R. THE HOBBIT; “Ring Trilogy”

Vance, Jack. THE EYES OF THE OVERWORLD; THE DYING EARTH; et al.

Weinbaum, Stanley.

Wellman, Manly Wade.

Williamson, Jack.

Zelazny, Roger. JACK OF SHADOWS; “Amber” Series; et al.

The most immediate influences upon AD&D were probably de Camp & Pratt, REH, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, HPL, and A. Merritt; but all of the above authors, as well as many not listed, certainly helped to shape the form of the game. For this reason, and for the hours of reading enjoyment, I heartily recommend the works of these fine authors to you.

Source: Gary Gygax. 1979. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons: Dungeon Master’s Guide, page 224.

To page with links on Amazon for these books.

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First Grognardia Post

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So, I was curious to read through the Grognardia blog, of which the author (James Maliszewski) stopped posting 5 years ago this month (12/11/2012). I found this thread on Dragonsfoot that addresses the author having family health issues. Not sure what happened after that. Regardless, God bless Mr. Maliszewksi (and his family), whatever happened, this guy was friggin prolific!!! It was actually not easy for me to get to the very first page (I like to read chronologically of course!). I scrolled and scrolled for like an hour!

And so I post the appropriate links here for anyone else searching for the first Grognardia posts:

Beginning of Stream

First Post: What is a Grognard (3/30/2008)